Author Profile Altaf Shaikh
Altaf Shaikh

BE Engg | Python Dev | Content Writer | Founder of TeachMeBro | Blockchain Dev | Django

Python 3 Installation

February 1st 2020   240

Python 3 Installation
Python 3 Installation

Python 3 Installation & Setup Guide

To get started working with Python 3, you’ll need to have access to the Python interpreter. There are several common ways to accomplish this:

  • Python can be obtained from the Python Software Foundation website at python.org. Typically, that involves downloading the appropriate installer for your operating system and running it on your machine.
  • Some operating systems, notably Linux, provide a package manager that can be run to install Python.
  • On macOS, the best way to install Python 3 involves installing a package manager called Homebrew. You’ll see how to do this in the relevant section in the tutorial.
  • On mobile operating systems like Android and iOS, you can install apps that provide a Python programming environment. This can be a great way to practice your coding skills on the go.

Alternatively, there are several websites that allow you to access a Python interpreter online without installing anything on your computer at all.

GOOGLE NOTEBOOK - It is an online Jupyter Notebook, here you can run python code and as well as install external libraries.

  • To setup Python3 Notebook
  • Click on File and click on New Python3 Notebook

REPL.IT - Online Python3 Interpreter for writing programs

Python 3.6 Installation Linux (Ubuntu):

Install the following dependencies:

$ sudo apt-get update
$ sudo apt-get install build-essential checkinstall
$ sudo apt-get install libreadline-gplv2-dev libncursesw5-dev libssl-dev libsqlite3-dev tk-dev libgdbm-dev libc6-dev libbz2-dev
  • Go to Download Python page on https://www.python.org/downloads/ and click Download Python 3.6.4 (You may see different version name).
  • In the terminal, go to the directory where the file is downloaded and run the command:

    $ tar -xvf Python-3.6.4.tgz

     

  • This will extract your zipped file. Note: The filename will be different if you've downloaded a different version. Use the appropriate filename.

  • Go to the extracted directory.

    $ cd Python-3.6.4

     

  • Issue the following commands to compile Python source code on your Operating system.

    $ ./configure
    $ make
    $ make install

     

  • Open Sublime text. To create a new file, go to File > New File (Shortcut: Ctrl+N).

  • Save the file with .py file extension like: hello.py or first-program.py

  • Write the code and save it (Ctrl+S or File > Save). For starters, you can copy the code below:

    print("Hello, World!")

     

  • This simple program outputs "Hello, World!"

  • Go to Tool > Build (Shortcut: Ctrl+B). You will see the output at the bottom of Sublime Text. Congratulations, you've successfully run your first Python program.

Install and Run Python in Windows

  • Go to Download Python page on https://www.python.org/downloads/ and click Download Python 3.6.4 (You may see different version name).
  • If your computer is running a 64-bit version of Windows, download the Windows x86-64 executable installer. Otherwise, download the Windows x86 executable installer. After downloading the installer, you should run it (doubleclick on it) and follow the instructions there.
  • One thing to watch out for: During the installation you will notice a window marked "Setup". Make sure you tick the "Add Python 3.6 to PATH" checkbox and click on "Install Now".
  • When Python is installed, a program called IDLE is also installed along with it. It provides graphical user interface to work with Python.
  • Open IDLE, copy the following code below and press enter.

    print("Hello, World!")

     

  • To create a file in IDLE, go to File > New Window (Shortcut: Ctrl+N).
  • Write Python code (you can copy the code below for now) and save (Shortcut: Ctrl+S) with .py file extension like: hello.py or your-first-program.py print("Hello, World!")
  • Go to Run > Run module (Shortcut: F5) and you can see the output. Congratulations, you've successfully run your first Python program.

Install and Run Python using PyCharm

Refer https://www.jetbrains.com/pycharm/

Install and Run Python using Anaconda

Refer https://www.anaconda.com/download/

Introduction to Prompt Window

You now should see a white or black window that is waiting for your commands.

Prompt: Linux OS (Ubuntu)

If you're on Linux, you probably see $ , just like this: terminal

$

To run Python script test.py

$ python3 test.py

For pip3:

$ sudo apt-get -y install python3-pip

$ pip3 install package_name

Prompt: Windows OS

On Windows, it's a > sign, like this: command-line

>

To run Python script test.py

> python test.py

For pip:

> pip install package_name

To check the installed version of Python

For Windows

> python --version
#output
Python 3.6.4

For Linux

$ python3 --version
#Output
Python 3.6.4

Using the Python Shell

Before starting to write programs, you ’ ll need to learn how to experiment with the Python shell. For now, you can think of the Python shell as a way to peer within running Python code. It places you inside of a running instance of Python, into which you can feed programming code; at the same time, Python will do what you have asked it to do and will show you a little bit about how it responds to its environment. Because running programs often have a context — things that you as the programmer have tailored to your needs — it is an advantage to have the shell because it lets you experiment with the context you have created.

In Windows cmd prompt

> python

>>>
To exit
>>> exit()

In Linux Terminal

$ python3

>>>
To exit
>>> exit()